Local History

Alderton is an old village, with the parish being known as "Alderton with Dixton" until 1831. It was mentioned in the Doomsday book as ALDRITONE or the "Town of Alder" and is thought to have been developed from two settlements, one lying to the east side, known locally as BRENTYARD, which contained the Church on its south side along with Church Road, School Road & Blacksmiths Road.

The other settlement lay to the west side, known as POLYSEND, with Beckford Road, Willow Bank Road and a path to the Church, which became St Margaret's Road.

 

It's location is almost certainly due to the existence of a patch of sand in a region of mainly clay, which with the clay subsoil, results in soil variations across the village. This enabled wells to be dug for the provision of a reliable fresh water supply, with a village pump in Cambridge Square in the 19th & early 20th Centuries. Mains electricity became available in 1930, water in 1933, sewage in 1937 and mains gas in 1938.Sand and gravel for road building were quarried in the village during the 19th Century, but other than this, Alderton appeared to have remained a self-contained farming and market gardening community over many centuries.

DIFFERENT BY DESIGN
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It has always been large compared to nearby settlements, the total population being recorded as 200 in the year 1700 and 487 in the 1861 census. A review in 1710 revealed that the community included 2 innkeepers (one from 1522), a tailor/weaver, 2 blacksmiths, a cordwainer and a stonemason/wheelwright. There was little influence from resident gentry or large landowners.

 

Self-dependence thrived with no true "Lord of the Manor" and with the village located away from the main highways and at an appreciable distance from towns. In 1860 there had been a possibility of a railway station, to link between Toddington via Alderton to Beckford, but it did not materialise due to an objection by the Earl of Weymss & March, whose land would have been required. Links with the local towns were by horse-drawn carriages and locals were known to walk to Cheltenham, shop and return to the village before lunchtime!

 

The Church of St Margaret of Antioch dates as a chapel, linked with Winchcombe, from pre-Norman Conquest times. The first Rector of Alderton was appointed in 1283, however, Alderton residents were required to be buried in Winchcombe until 1379, when it was decided to provide a graveyard in the village. Incidentally, Alderton managed more than 700 years with a full-time rector, who in Victorian times, was the major village landowner and who expected commensurate recognition, including the doffing of caps by the men & boys and curtsying by the girls - how times have changed!

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Local History

Alderton is an old village, with the parish being known as "Alderton with Dixton" until 1831. It was mentioned in the Doomsday book as ALDRITONE or the "Town of Alder" and is thought to have been developed from two settlements, one lying to the east side, known locally as BRENTYARD, which contained the Church on its south side along with Church Road, School Road & Blacksmiths Road.

 

The other settlement lay to the west side, known as POLYSEND, with Beckford Road, Willow Bank Road and a path to the Church, which became St Margaret's Road.

 

It's location is almost certainly due to the existence of a patch of sand in a region of mainly clay, which with the clay subsoil, results in soil variations across the village. This enabled wells to be dug for the provision of a reliable fresh water supply, with a village pump in Cambridge Square in the 19th & early 20th Centuries. Mains electricity became available in 1930, water in 1933, sewage in 1937 and mains gas in 1938.Sand and gravel for road building were quarried in the village during the 19th Century, but other than this, Alderton appeared to have remained a self-contained farming and market gardening community over many centuries.

It has always been large compared to nearby settlements, the total population being recorded as 200 in the year 1700 and 487 in the 1861 census. A review in 1710 revealed that the community included 2 innkeepers (one from 1522), a tailor/weaver, 2 blacksmiths, a cordwainer and a stonemason/wheelwright. There was little influence from resident gentry or large landowners.

 

Self-dependence thrived with no true "Lord of the Manor" and with the village located away from the main highways and at an appreciable distance from towns. In 1860 there had been a possibility of a railway station, to link between Toddington via Alderton to Beckford, but it did not materialise due to an objection by the Earl of Weymss & March, whose land would have been required. Links with the local towns were by horse-drawn carriages and locals were known to walk to Cheltenham, shop and return to the village before lunchtime!

 

The Church of St Margaret of Antioch dates as a chapel, linked with Winchcombe, from pre-Norman Conquest times. The first Rector of Alderton was appointed in 1283, however, Alderton residents were required to be buried in Winchcombe until 1379, when it was decided to provide a graveyard in the village. Incidentally, Alderton managed more than 700 years with a full-time rector, who in Victorian times, was the major village landowner and who expected commensurate recognition, including the doffing of caps by the men & boys and curtsying by the girls - how times have changed!

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